Short-term missions trip opportunity in France – Summer 2009

The private French Christian school where Angela and I volunteer and our daughter attends, (Collège-Daniel) recently acquired some land with some “cabins” on it. We have a project this summer to renovate those cabins into classrooms and office space for this coming September. We have partnered with EuroTeam, a branch of Greater Europe Mission, to oversee the renovation work.

At present the project is in jeopardy as we lack the workers to actually accomplish the renovation. This post is a call to any/all who might be interested in participating in a 2-week short-term renovation-project missions trip to the Alsace region of France this summer. Individuals and/or groups are welcome.

This printable PDF flyer gives more details and could be posted in churches or Christian schools, etc. Please feel free to pass on this blog post and/or PDF file to potentially interested people/groups.

For those who are interested, please use the contact information in the PDF file as WE are NOT the ones coordinating the team; that is what EuroTeam is doing. Thanks!

FileHippo Updater

I download a LOT of software. I’m searching a lot for freeware, etc. I’m a “feature-freak” and like a very full toolbox. There are a ton of sites out there with a lot of “flotsam and jetsam” to wade through. Everything is a “free download” but that no longer means that what you’re downloading is “free.”

I’ve found that in the sites that I download from, FileHippo has a unique feature that I really like: file versions. You don’t always need a back version but sometimes it will really save your bacon and they seem to keep a zillion versions of anything that they host. They don’t host everything but they do host a lot of the stuff I use.

At any rate, all my downloading and installing means more things that can get out of date as well. So today I discovered that they have a handy utility that will scan your system for installed software that they host, compare version and give you a results web page with direct download links for the software on your system, for which they host a more recent version. I tried it today and it’s been a downloading/installing fest. It can run at startup, do its check, and if it finds nothing, it terminates itself. I like that!

Check it out! https://www.filehippo.com/updatechecker/

RegEx Nirvana?

My technology path has covered a fairly large swath of operating systems and user environments. I’ve gotten quite familiar with different line-command, GUI and full-screen text (3270) environments. I typically customize any environment I work with.

Currently as part of our missionary work, I’m a systems/network administrator in a small private school in France. I’m the only fish in the pond so I get to do everything. It also means I have to do everything. I don’t have the luxury, therefore, to get good at every technology that I work with. If I don’t know it, I have to teach myself, etc. No training budget here.

My background in programming in various environments and database administration in various environments serves me well in many situations. On thing continues to give me fits, however, regular expressions. These beasts are anything but regular! One thing they are, however, is ubiquitous! As a “mostly Windows guy”, I could get by without them, but even there, more and more pieces of software are adding regex capabilities into their find/replace functions. Add to that the fact that I maintain Linux servers (a self-taught area that has caused me no small amount of head-scratching!) and I absolutely cannot escape regular expressions.

As stated earlier, I don’t have the time to learn every good piece of technology that’s out there, nor a training budget…which translates to no tool budget either. So, I need a good piece of freeware/open source that “holds my hand” in the occasional, but deep, regular expression activity. There’s lots of freeware out there, but 90% of it is simply testing regex…not really helping you understand how to write them. I would search, in vain, occasionally for something that could help me.

Well, I finally found something!!!!

Regulazy (and its big brother Regulator) are written by Roy Osherove and can be found here: https://weblogs.asp.net/rosherove/pages/tools-and-frameworks-by-roy-osherove.aspx I highly recommend them as ideal tools to help you build and test regex’s.

I resent the name Regulazy, but I love its facility to write for you the regex by stepping through a complex string and suggesting appropriate matching expressions for each part of it.

Anyway, thanks Roy for those great tools!!!! You’re helping busy sysadmins the world over!

Testing Wordbook…

Okey-dokey, this is simply a quick test post to see if my WordPress-to-Facebook plugin Wordbook is actually functioning correctly.  Besides that, I’d actually like to see HOW it functions.  If this works and shows up…well that would mean that all past posts will not be automatically stuck on my Facebook mini-feed…which I suppose is a good thing.  Voilà…(that’s French for “voila”) 😉

Flourishing as Genuine Humans in 2009

I’m desperate to somehow dump all my pithy and profound thoughts about 2009 out in some elegant manner…but I’m more desperate to link to these teachings…where NT Wright does a much better job than I ever could in being pithy and profound.

This 3-part lecture series was part of InterVarsity’s Following Christ 2008 conference held at the end of December. I believe it dovetails well with some of the things I mentioned in our last Prayer Bulletin regarding prophetic words for 2009 and generally “what God is up to and wants us to be up to” right about now! 😉

For those who are used to listening to NT Wright, you’ll know that he speaks in a lot of “shorthand”, whereby a certain term or phrase has (literally) volumes of teaching behind it. This series is, in my opinion, particularly “dense” and bids you listen to it more than once…it will be worth it! Additionally, Wright uses as his text the book of Colossians. He refers to it almost as a “study” of the book. So, if you listen with a copy of Colossians in front of you, you’ll probably gain even more insight.

Wisdom

Glory

Virtue

The Wisdom We ALL Need

I just received Jeff Fountain’s Weekly Word by e-mail today. I confess that often I don’t have time to read them. Today, I’m a bit under the weather so a more measured pace has me perusing some e-mails that otherwise would suffer neglect due to my haste.

This one was a gem! I quote it in its entirety:

The wisdom Europe needs

• European leaders came to an historic agreement in Brussels last week to limit co2 emission levels to help save the environment.
• Just a few days earlier, Christian scientists and philosophers met to discuss the relationship between faith and science at the University of Leiden in Holland.
• Also near Leiden, in 1642, two philosophers met in a castle to discuss this same topic-the interface of science and faith. Europe’s future, including that of her environment, would depend on which of these men’s views prevailed.
• It still does.

French philosopher René Descartes, sometimes called the Father of Modern Philosophy, spent most of his adult life in the Dutch Republic. He had been lodging in Endegeest Castle for several months before his visitor arrived for their four-hour discussion. Descartes’ famous statement, Cogito ergo sum, was to mark a fresh beginning in Western thought based on rationalism. His dualism separated the physical from the spiritual, science from religion.

Jan Amos Comenius, although exiled from his homeland at the time, also brought with him a reputation as one of Europe’s leading thinkers. He would earn himself the title Father of Modern Education and is today one of the Czech Republic’s national heroes. Comenius had developed a holistic or integrated philosophy called ‘pansophy‘, meaning ‘all wisdom’, taken from Colossians 1:28: We proclaim him, admonishing and teaching everyone with all wisdom, so that we may present everyone perfect in Christ.

Wisdom for Comenius was more than simply knowledge of things. It involved knowing the relationships between all things. It meant knowing the right decisions to improve conditions and circumstances. It was the ‘fullness of the right knowledge’.

Respect & Reservation
Both men had prepared for their meeting by reading at least some of each other’s works. They approached each other with respect and reservation.

Comenius proposed a philosophy of unity with distinct but not separated fields of science, while Descartes objected to the integration of non-rational knowledge with science.

The two men cordially exchanged arguments without convincing the other. They continued to hold different views on man and his world. The Frenchman, a practising Catholic, saw man as an observer of the world from the outside. The Czech, one of the last bishops in the Ancient Moravian Church, understood man as an inseparable part of something that had been a harmonious whole until disrupted by the Fall.

Comenius continued to criticise a science free of moral values which would result in the fragmentation of the essence and existence of man. He foresaw accurately that separation of faith and natural science would lead men to ask what could be done rather than what ought be done. The Cartesian reductionist approach merely asked for causes, not meaning or destination, he objected.

Ring of gold
He who improves in scientific knowledge and thereby declines in moral knowledge, will end up in decline rather than progress,’ he wrote. Quoting from Proverbs 11:22, he said learnedness without virtue was ‘like a ring of gold in a pig’s nose‘.

How different Western history could have been had Comenius’ pansophy prevailed! Today we find ourselves facing drastic measures to correct problems arising from Cartesian dualism.

The scientists and philosophers who met recently in Leiden believe the answer lies in Comenius-style wisdom, integrating faith and science. Twenty-two Christian scholars complied the book, ‘Geleerd en gelovig‘ (something like, ‘Scholars and believers‘), presented to the Dutch Prime Minister on the occasion of the Veritas Forum.

Jan Peter Balkenende suggested that faith and science today were actually closer than often presumed. Both involved a search for truth that existed but could never be fully known. Faith didn’t make you better a scientist or politician, said the prime minister, but raised different questions. Take the environment debate, for example. We seek all sorts of technical solutions. But the question how to steward God’s creation and pass it on to the next generation, for him personally, had a spiritual dimension.

That doesn’t make me a better politician morally,’ he admitted, ‘but it does shape my way of thinking.’

I, for one, think Europe would be a better place with more of this pansophy.

And I, for one think that the United States would be a better place with more of this pansophy.